Reflections from a Hot Tub

We sank into the steamy hot tub under the stars last night - this is often where we do our best chatting and planning about the ranch (being true to our 'extra' selves) - when the Homestead Husband tells me that he was introduced to someone at work, when another coworker said, "oh he has a legit farm" [or something to that effect].




Both of us laughed, as we often still feel like as far as we have come, we are just not there yet (you know, after we built a barn and paddock, and have a hay dealer on speed dial now...). So, it's funny to hear an outsiders perspective.





We literally buy hay in bulk and I sat there thinking to myself, me? A legit farm? Ha! I suppose feelings of "imposter syndrome" could be at play - easy to do when there are so many role models with more experience than I, that I admire.


We still have a lot of big plans, so when we measure our progress on where we are vs. where we plan to go, we feel behind still (kinda sounds crazy and I can't believe I had the audacity to think we hadn't "made it" yet!).


The task can feel daunting. Especially as we look to expand. Had we planned on going this route earlier on in our days, maybe we would have looked for cleared land, with structures already built. It would have made things easier, certainly. But, the alternative is that we get to appreciate every part of the process. We have the unique opportunity to build this ranch literally from scratch. And if that isn't something to be proud of, I'm not sure what is. It more than brings meaning to the "Dirigo" motto (meaning "I Lead").


When you're soaking up the moonlight watching shooting stars, that fresh air will get to you, and it made me ponder a little more deeply about said perspective...




We [as a collective] may often forget to celebrate where we are at. There is beauty in becoming. To take time to acknowledge the amount that we have overcome or put into getting to just today. While it took us both aback a little to hear someone credit us with legitimacy, it might just be ok, to allow ourselves acceptance of such a compliment. This doesn't just apply to us though... regardless of what you're working towards, be it beef cattle, achieving success on a recipe, capturing intricacies with a paint brush, putting in the overtime - it's easy to get caught up in the nitty gritty and forget how many strides you have made and why you're still at it.


So, I thought I'd share a genuine reminder to encourage all of us to keep going, but while you're in the thick of it, pause and give yourself an "atta boy" from time to time.